Al Ayn Tombs- Historic Remains from the Bronze Age

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Al Ayn Tombs, located in Oman have been declared as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1988 as they are known to be one of the best preserved graveyards. The tombs are believed to have existed from 3000 to 2000 B.C.E. and the tomb structures are prominent against the rocky background. A collection of around twenty one tombs outline the ragged edges of the Northern Omani mountains of Jabal al Misht, which is considered to be one of Oman’s ‘exotics’ and looks breath-taking during a sunset. The unique structure of the Al Ayn Tombs take the form of beehives and are thus commonly referred to as the ‘Beehive tombs’. The Tombs are built from limestone blocks and measures around 5 metres across with a single small triangular entrance. The hike up to the mountains and the terrain of the tombs could be a little tiresome under the heat of the blazing sun, therefore visiting the ancient ruins in the morning or late afternoon is always recommended. The site is popular amongst locals and tourists alike and visitors searching a great respite after the exhausting day could choose to stay at anĀ Oman resort that enjoys a tranquil surrounding such as Anantara Al Jabal Al Akdhar Resort.

A unique feature of the Al Ayn tombs as compared to modern cemeteries in Oman where the head and feet of the buried corpse is generally designated by a plain unmarked stone, the ancient tombs of Al Ayn are a great way to understand the Omani history and culture, as the limestone structure is starking contrast from the modern graveyards. Located in North-Western Oman, the beehive tombs from the Bronze Age are one of three preserved protohistoric sites in Oman; with others known as Bat and Al Khutm.

Auburn Silver is a travel writer who has a passion for fashion and a deep interest in admiring new and exotic attractions around the world. Google+

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