St Paul’s Cathedral – A Historic Monument

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Your trip to London will not be complete without a visit to the St Paul’s Cathedral which has always held a special place in the capital’s historical and cultural value. The St Paul’s Cathedral Dome which is framed by spires of Wren’s City Churches used to be the most prominent feature to adorn the London skyline for over 300 years.

St Paul’s Cathedral goes back a long way to the age of the Normans and Christopher Wren who designed the modern cathedral and fought many challenges in his endeavour to retain its value as an ancient place of worship as well as a historic landmark. The Cathedral’s architectural style is described as a ‘restrained Baroque’ and pays tribute to the architect’s close relationship with French architecture as well as the 17th century Roman architecture which he loved dearly.

If you are inclined to enjoy historical sightseeing, staying in the district of Belgravia you will give you easy access to St Paul’s Cathedral and many other attractions. If you take the trouble to do a Google search for a Belgravia hotel London has to offer, you will come across many good options that afford easy access and all the creature comforts you will need during your stay. One such place would be COMO The Halkin, London.

The Cathedral is a place of national pride and many a famous funeral services and other important occasions have taken place inside this historic building. The famous Duke of Wellington’s funeral service took place at St Paul’s Cathedral as did the funeral services of former premier Sir Winston Churchill and the ‘Iron Lady’, Margaret Thatcher. On a happier note, the jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria and the extravagant and elegant wedding ceremony of Prince Charles and Princesses Diana also took place at the St Paul’s Cathedral.

Auburn Silver is a travel writer who has a passion for fashion and a deep interest in admiring new and exotic attractions around the world.

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