Tower of London – A Touch of History

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In 16th and 17th century London the saying ‘sent to the Tower’ was a common term used to describe the fates of disgraced royals who were sent to the Tower of London to be imprisoned. During the two World Wars, this structure was once more utilised as a place to hold prisoners and 12 people were executed for espionage within its walls. In its early days, the Tower served as an opulent royal residency yet throughout history this grand building was a symbol of the ruling class’ oppression of the common people.

If you’re considering a visit to the Tower of London to get a whiff of its troubled yet eventful past consider staying at a nearby London boutique hotel such as the well placed COMO The Halkin, London.

The Tower of London was established during the historical Norman Conquest of 1066 but the building rose to prominence after William the Conqueror built the White Tower in 1078. The Tower of London as the name suggests is centred around two concentric rings of protective walls as well as a moat. It is a multifaceted building with a number of constructions set within the rings.

In spite of its brutal reputation, the tower had a number of other uses throughout the ages. Some courts used the tower as an armoury while others used it as a treasury, a public record house or even a menagerie.

As with many ancient and oppressive constructions, the Tower of London is rife with numerous ghostly and terrible tales. In the 15th century, two young princes, the sons of Edward the 4th of England were placed in the tower by their uncle and it is said that he killed the two princes before he took the throne himself. Enriched by tales of woe, oppression and mystery, the Tower of London is considered the most haunted premises in the UK.

Intrigued by history, art and food, Lavinia Woolf is a writer who is passionate about the extraordinary and writes of the exhilarating and enchanting.

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